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Review: The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander

Posted on Aug 13, 2020 by in Michelle Alexander | 0 comments

THE NEW JIM CROW

Michelle Alexander

BLURB

Seldom does a book have the impact of Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow. Since it was first published in 2010, it has been cited in judicial decisions and has been adopted in campus-wide and community-wide reads; it helped inspire the creation of the Marshall Project and the new $100 million Art for Justice Fund; it has been the winner of numerous prizes, including the prestigious NAACP Image Award; and it has spent nearly 250 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list.

Most important of all, it has spawned a whole generation of criminal justice reform activists and organizations motivated by Michelle Alexander’s unforgettable argument that “we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it.” As the Birmingham News proclaimed, it is “undoubtedly the most important book published in this century about the U.S.”

Now, ten years after it was first published, The New Press is proud to issue a tenth-anniversary edition with a new preface by Michelle Alexander that discusses the impact the book has had and the state of the criminal justice reform movement today.

★★★★★

“Martin Luther King Jr. called for us to be lovestruck with each other, not colorblind toward each other. To be lovestruck is to care, to have deep compassion, and to be concerned for each and every individual, including the poor and vulnerable.”

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness is filled with a lot of information to digest. I spent the last couple of weeks reading/listening to it and thinking about what was being presented. The author shared facts and cases of what is happening especially with the ‘War on Drugs’ and the parallels to enslavement.

This book was written 10 years ago and is still relevant today. A lot of the same things are still happening today that were addressed in the book. In some ways, our country has come along ways but even more importantly we still have a long way to go in the way minorities are treated.

“Seeing race is not the problem. Refusing to care for the people we see is the problem. The fact that the meaning of race may evolve over time or lose much of its significance is hardly a reason to be struck blind. We should hope not for a colorblind society but instead for a world in which we can see each other fully, learn from each other, and do what we can to respond to each other with love. That was King’s dream—a society that is capable of seeing each of us, as we are, with love. That is a goal worth fighting for.”

 

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