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The Contradiction of Solitude by A. Meredith Walters {review}

Posted on Mar 9, 2015 by in A. Meredith Walters | 0 comments

The Contradiction of Solitude
A. Meredith Walters

From Amazon.com:

You may notice me, but you will never know me.
I prefer it that way.
I am the daughter of a monster.
Born from blood and lies.
Dead before I have truly lived.
But Elian tells me that I'm different.
He tells me that I'm beautiful.
That I'm an enigma wrapped in irresistibly complicated skin.
Elian says that he loves me.
These words terrify me.
I can't trust love.
Or hope.
Or truth.
Because I fear the beast inside.
It threatens to drown Elian and his sweet, unconditional love.
It's a beast that will destroy everything.

**Reader Warning**
There is NO warning. I won't tell you if there's a HEA, a cliffhanger, or a love triangle. Just read it and find out for yourself but please don't post spoilers.
The fun of a story is figuring it all out!

Foxy’s Review:

After some ‘arm twisting’ FMA has wrangled me into reading this one with her.

description

The Contradiction of Solitude was more of a psychological thriller than a true romance. A psychological thriller by definition is suspenseful book (or movie) emphasizing the psychology of it’s characters rather than the plot. Even though this wouldn’t be classified as a romance it does have a love story…granted it is a sick and twisted love story but that’s what happens when the mental state of a person is affected.

”Words mattered. When spoken they couldn’t be taken back. So it was important to make them count. Each and every time.” I don’t want to give the plot away because being caught up in the unknown with this story is part of the fun. Just keep in mind the story is deep and dark and in an insane world “it all makes sense”.

description

The writing, at times, is lyrical along with some onomatopoeia. “Thump. Thump. Thud.” (onomatopoeia). One word, in particular, had me wondering what it’s purpose was each time I saw it -> “buzz”?

I know I already said this but I think it needs to be said again ->While this isn’t a romance… the love story, between all involved, was questionable at best because their sanity was out of balance. If you want an unconventional story consider this one because it draws outside the lines.

STANDALONE

Goodreads review with status updates -> http://bit.ly/10SZLLx
Purchase on Amazon ->http://amzn.to/1HfqW3f

After seeing a bunch of low ratings and  talking with friends who were struggling with this book… I wanted to add this as a side note.

Here is why I think it is getting low ratings… it is marketed to romance readers when it is NOT a romance. There’s a love story but it’s a disturbing love story.

I have two close friends who work with the mentally ill. One is a nurse in a hospital (mental ward) and the other is a doctor who has his own practice. Every time I hear stories from them I always think…‘WTF. That can’t be for real…that doesn’t make sense.’ But once they explain how in a psychotic’s mind it does make sense… I’m always like – ‘wow, that’s bizarre.’

In psychological thrillers there may not be a traditional “hea” (happily ever after).  What a ‘normal’ person thinks is a hea is not necessarily what someone who is psychotic would think is an hea.

Also in psychological thrillers the characters are usually not likable because they’re screwed up.  Their thinking process isn’t the same as the majority of the public’s.

Did any of you read- Fight Club? And I’m not talking about watching the movie BUT actually reading the book. The book is different than the movie. The book is a love story (a psychotic one but one none the less). Or  what about Mud Vein?  Or Gone Girl? The Contradiction of Solitude is like that … being in the mind of someone who has mentally lost it and isn’t coming back to “reality” is hard.

Maybe knowing you aren’t going to love the characters and there isn’t any romance in this book will help you decide if this book is for you.  I know that you can’t expect romance readers to want to read a book that contains no romance. It’s like apple and oranges, they aren’t the same. It’s like giving someone who reads Christian romance the 50 Shades of Grey book… they aren’t going to like it.  It’s the wrong target audience.  But I’m also huge advocate of readers going out of their comfort zone and trying a new genre. A reader will  never know if they like another genre if they don’t at least give it a try.  And once they try it, either way- love it/loathe it, at least they will have an opinion based on experience.

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